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Interview with John Knox: Deciding NOT to Buy a Camera

Welcome to the 4th episode of the Lean Decisions podcast.

As part of my research into lean decisions, I interview people about the decisions they make and how they make them. This podcast publishes these interviews for you to learn from them too.

In this episode, I talk with John Knox (@WindAddict), a mobile developer at Evernote and creator of the blog Engineering Adventure, about a decision he made NOT to buy a camera. John talks about the process he went through to make this decision and the mental cost of letting decisions linger.

This episode is part 2 of 2 of my interview with John. If you missed the first part, where we discussed his decision to start a T-shirt company, you can listen to it here.

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In this interview, John talked about his decision not to buy a camera. He decides not to buy his camera after considering:

  1. How fast camera technology continues to evolve
    While the camera he wanted was technically superior, new types of cameras are being developed that will have similar quality at a much smaller size.
  2. Better technology isn’t what he needs
    He has a backlog of photos and much of his joy comes from producing finished works and sharing them with others. The new camera wouldn’t help him do this faster.
  3. The mental cost to letting decisions linger
    John talks about how not locking the decision in reduces your focus as you waste your time continually thinking about the decision.

To help him make the decision, John asked himself, would buying this camera make his life better in the long-term? In the end, he decided no and let the decision go.

The Lean Decisions podcast is a bi-weekly feature on this blog. To subscribe, enter your e-mail in the subscription box at the end of this post.

If you missed the last episode, where I interviewed John about his decision to start a t-shirt company before the Business of Software conference, listen to it here.

If you have any feedback on this episode, or would like to be interviewed for my research, please leave a comment below.

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